St. Patrick’s Day Profits

St. Patrick's Day

Is it the luck of the Irish that St. Patty’s is on Monday this year?

Many bars make as much as 1% of their annual sales on St. Patrick’s Day and some bar/restaurant concepts with year ‘round Irish themes average a month’s worth of business on the single-day holiday alone!  Since St. Patty’s Day 2014 falls on a Monday, a lot of celebrations will begin on the Friday before and run through the entire weekend. This week’s Deal of the Week makes it easy to profit from St. Patrick’s Day 2014, which will most likely have your customers partying for several days.

In addition to standard items like pub and beer glasses and pitchers, make sure you are stocked up on essentials like beer glass cleaner, beer drip tray sanitizer strips, and beer tap plugs.

Even if your business is not hosting a St. Patrick’s Day celebration, you can still give customers a taste of the Emerald Isle by creating festive drink and cocktail specials using Monin Premium Irish Cream Syrup.

Should You Highlight The Mediterranean Diet?

It’s the beginning of the year, and that means the beginning of new diets and exercise plans for everybody. By late February, many people who may have started the year with good intentions have fallen off their plans. One diet that would be easy to handle, as it allows a variety of tasty foods, is the Mediterranean diet that’s been surging in popularity in recent years.

Nation’s Restaurant News reports on the diet, pointing out that it’s less of a specific diet and more of an eating focus “with an emphasis on healthful high antioxidant-, fiber-rich ingredients such as fresh fruits, vegetables, legumes and whole grains, and healthier fats derived from olive oil, nuts, and seafood.” Both the American Heart Association and American Diabetes Association have highlighted the diet as ways to manage health for years, with it encouraging a variety of foods.

The diet doesn’t prohibit meat and meat products, but just minimizes them, especially in comparison to fish. Olive oil, fruits, and veggies are generally considered tasty components of meals that most consumers enjoy. The concept comes from the traditional diets of those in Greece, Spain, and Southern Italy. It features a significant amount of monounsaturated fats, which have been suggested to lead to a reduction of coronary heart disease risk, improve cholesterol regulation, LDL cholesterol reduction, and features other anti-hypertensive and inflammatory effects.

Naturally, these health benefits are ideal for many, focusing on not just losing weight and gaining more energy, but towards adjusting many ailments. The addition of red wine to the diet adds antixodants with their inclusion of flavonoids.

NRN’s suggestions on how restaurants can include this diet include

Enhance the natural flavor of dishes through herbs and spices rather than salt. Basil, cilantro, ginger and saffron are just a few accents that can complement any sauce, dressing, marinade, soup or entrée.

Boost the use of fruits and vegetables. Bring color and variety to salads and seafood dishes with fresh, seasonal fruits, and add hearty vegetables to chili, soups and noodle dishes.

Provide alternative sources of protein. Use proteins such as omega-3 rich salmon, tuna or shrimp, or make substitutions available in place of traditional meats in entrées and salads.

Use extra-virgin olive oil in place of butter and highly saturated dressings.Use it to flavor salads and drizzle over vegetables and pastas. It can also be used in low-heat food preparation.

Add texture with fiber-rich foods. Infuse texture into dishes by adding fiber-rich beans and legumes into salads and side dishes, and nuts and seeds as toppings.

Replace refined grain breads and noodles with whole grains. Use brown rice, quinoa, whole-wheat pasta and wild rice in place of refined grains wherever possible.

Naturally, a new focus on wine in your restaurant could also find its way into the diets of your customers. Many of the items on your menu might fit with these suggestions, so it shouldn’t take too much to adjust your menu to highlight the diet.

Soft Drinks Face Continued Challenges

The soft drink world has faced constant problems in recent years, all stemming from a perception and link towards increased obesity rates in America. With soft drinks being traditionally high in sugar, they find themselves in the crosshairs of politicians and dietitians. While New York avoided a “sugary drink tax,” the concept has not disappeared.

The International Business Times reports that New Zealanders find themselves in support of limiting the amount of sugar that can be included in soft drinks. 46% surveyed “definitely” support a limit, while 32% “possibly” do. Less support the concept of taxing sugary drinks, but 46% agree on a tax. A greater 59% prefer a limit on serving size. While New Zealand has no plans to introduce a tax (and Coca-Cola claims that it “cannot solve the obesity crisis”), the World Health Organization does cite the country with one of the worst increasing obesity rates and fast-food consumption. Taxing sugary drinks would help curb obesity, if only to encourage people not to drink them.

A tax has been proposed for Illinois, though. Akin to the New York proposal, it would tax any sugary drink, adding one cent per ounce, and would add a $2.88 tax to each case. Companies and retail establishments fear the loss of sales from the drinks, especially when the tax on a case of drinks might be about the same price as the case itself. California is also proposing a bill, SB 1000, that would require a warning label on any drink that was sold in stores with added sweeteners, featuring 75 or more calories per 12 ounces stating “STATE OF CALIFORNIA SAFETY WARNING: Drinking beverages with added sugar(s) contributes to obesity, diabetes, and tooth decay.” For restaurants with self-serve drinks, it would be on the dispenser. Restaurants that keep drinks behind the counter would feature it on the counter. While many companies have featured voluntary labels listing calories on bottles, many are opposed to this new enforced labeling.

It may not require taxation or special labeling to curtail the consumption of sugary drinks. Coca-Cola reports that 2013′s revenue was not as what was expected: global sales did not rise as much as they wanted, and US sales actually lowered.

Coca-Cola said on Tuesday that global sales volumes rose 1 percent in the quarter and 2 percent for the full year. Volumes in North America fell 1 percent in the quarter, while those in Europe grew just 1 percent as consumer spending remained subdued.

Coca-Cola is joined by Pepsi in reduced sales in America and other developed nations, as people reach for healthier options. In hopes of improved sales of their drinks, Coca-Cola bought a 10% stake in Green Mountain Coffee Roasters, known for their Keurig coffee makers; Coke is looking to use their technology and mindset to develop an in-home beverage dispenser. Meanwhile, they look to save $1 billion in productivity improvements, and will funnel that money towards advertising.

Have you noticed a slip in soft drink sales in your restaurant, and do you have any plans to combat that? How would you handle taxes or new labeling requirements?